Lesson Annotations

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22 thoughts on “Lesson Annotations

  1. cristinamasi says:

    Annotated Bibliography
    Songcharoen, Somjade J et al. “Caveat Spectator; Digital Imaging and Data Manipulation.” Mayo Clinic proceedings, vol. 89, no. 8, Aug. 2014., pp. 1036-41 Family Health Database; Health & Medical Collection; Science Database, http://search.proquest.com.librda.mville.edu:2048/docview/1552687693?accountid=12257. Accessed 17 Feb. 2017. In this article Somjade Songchareon et al. discuss the behind the scenes technology that is used to manipulate consumers into believing that the models shown are real. Songchareon et al. use technological facts to encourage the idea that the people in the advertisements do not resemble the people in the advertisements. Songchareon conveys the idea that technology is rapidly changing. Songchareon et al. discusses how image manipulation Adobe Photoshop, but gives readers advice on how to get the best selfie lighting. However, Songchareon et al. mainly focuses on the dramatic difference Adobe Photoshop has on both professional models and everyday consumers. Both Songchareon and Clay are doctors at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Uldis Bite is a plastic surgeon at the Mayo Clinic. This article was published in 2014 which may seem a bit dated, but the same topic is still relevant today, if anything the software technology has only advanced; thus, making this article a good source to use in my paper.

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  2. geolevine says:

    Songcharoen, Somjade J., et al. “Caveat spectator: digital imaging and data manipulation.” Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 89, no. 8, 2014, p. 1036+. Academic OneFile, go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=AONE&sw=w&u=nysl_me_manhaclb&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CA381587313&asid=f0558f2ac7aef87922e33caf7c109e48. Accessed 19 Feb. 2017. In this publication, contributors, Songcharoen, Uldis, & Clay 2014 discuss the technology, reasoning, and impact of digitally manipulated images both within the scientific and consumer realm. Songcharoen et al., 2014 highlights the numerous technology advances such as Photoshop and “GIMP (GNU Image Manipulating Program).” Songcharoen et al., 2014 details how mass program availability leads to users of all skill level, and shows that despite intentions of conveying an accurate photo representation, skill inadequacies, dictate how the picture will be reflected and interpreted by others. Somjade J. Songcharoen is a MD at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, in Jackson, Mississippi. He specializes in plastic surgery and has other publications in that field. Uldis Bite MD works at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, New York and specializes Oral, Maxillofacial Surgery, and plastic surgery. Ricky Clay MD like Songcharoen, works at the University of Mississippi Medical Center and also specializes in plastic surgery. This research was published in 2014 and pertains to my topic because it shows how small alterations in digital imaging can result in a skewed idea of the advertised product. My topic is based around public response to driverless cars and prior to their introduction, advertising for them will be critical. This publication gives me insight on various effects of driverless car acceptance and consumer expectations may origin from digital misrepresentations.

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  3. emmyquinonez says:

    Perez, William. “Not Just a Latino Issue.” Journal of College Admission”. 1 Jan 2010. Academic Search Premier, http://web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?vid=3&sid=d73042c8-df0e-4880-b14e-b895677a365c%40sessionmgr4010&hid=4206&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#AN=47506524&db=aph.
    Accessed 20 Feb.2017. In this article Perez shows the cases of different undocumented college students, who come from countries other than latin american countries. Perez compares the different lives of these students and he shows that it is much easier for them not being latino immigrants, because they are able to hide from the reality of their illegal status. Within the article Perez makes it clear that his readers should know and understand that not all undocumented individuals are from Mexico, Central and South America. Even though all of the lives of these students are different they all go through the same struggle of staying in the country. Perez states that “Isolation among these communities is largely due to the invisibility of their immigration status because of the idea that it is only a Latino issue.” This suggest that not being able to see and realize that immigrants don’t only come from known countries but from others that aren’t well known can lead to the isolation of within the immigrants. Perez says “ No student feels judge” he wants students to not fear that by sharing their stories that they will be judge for who they are and for trying to make their lives better than it could’ve been in their own countries. Perez is an associate professor of education in Claremont Graduate University’s School of Educational Studies. Perez’s research and teaching focus on the social and psychological development of immigrant students; educational, social, and cultural capital; prejudice and discrimination in educational settings; and minority access to higher education. I will use this in my presentation and paper to show that the ideas of undocumented immigrants coming from only Mexico and central America are wrong. Many different immigrants come from different countries.

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  4. yumiko30 says:

    Perez, William. “Not Just a Latino Issue.” Journal of College Admission 1 Jan.2010. Academic Search Premier, http://web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?vid=3&sid=d73042c8-df0e-4880-b14e-b895677a365c%40sessionmgr4010&hid=4206&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#AN=47506524&db=aph.
    Accessed 20 Feb.2017. In this article, Perez inform that exist a lot of undocumented college students in the United States. Comparing with legal students, these undocumented students have to go through many difficulties. Perez believes that every Undocumented student have the same problems, does not matter where you come from, but for students non-latino are more easy to hide their status. Perez says “ By and large, however, many undocumented students do feel that they are alone on their path to college. And this is especially the reality of non-Latino undocumented students”. Perez suggests that every student should has the same opportunities because they deserve improve their lives and demonstrate that they can offer something better to this country. William Perez is an associate professor of education in Claremont Graduate University’s School of Educational Studies. Author of Immigrant youth, Minority access to education, Ethnic identity and development, Academic achievement.The article was published seven years ago, and it is perfect for my topic on Life as a Latino Undocumented in the United States. I will use this in my paper to support my ideas of how many problems college students have to go through to improve their lives.

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  5. Anonymous says:

    Kilbride, Samantha. “Feminism: The Importance In Removing The Stigma From The New F-Word.” Elite Daily, 6 Aug. 2015, Elite Daily, elitedaily.com/women/femi-nazi-feminism-wrong-perspective-change/976974/. Accessed 21 Feb. 2017. Samantha Kilbride, author of “Feminism: The Importance In Removing The Stigma From The New F-Word” discusses how she always believed in the equality of the sexes, but never considered herself a feminist. She always knew that there were many like her who were afraid to label themselves as a “feminist” because in society that word has such a many harsh stereotypes. She goes on to state that “The movement of feminism is to celebrate both genders and to liberate both men and women from the gender roles.” Kilbride is trying to get across that their is no solid look to what a feminist is in the past, present or future and that if you want equality for all, then you are a feminist. Samantha Kilbride is a contributing author in Elite Magazine and has written articles on human rights, poetry and health and fitness. The reason that we plan on using this article is to help show the shrewd misconceptions of feminism in society and what it is/means to be a feminist.

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  6. melinastranofyp says:

    “How Injuries Can Affect Athletes Later On In Life.” Liverpool Training Solutions UK, Liverpool Training Solutions, 10 Mar. 2014, http://www.liverpooltrainingsolutions.uk.com/injuries-can-affect-athletes-later-life/. Accessed 23 Feb. 2016. Liverpool Training Solutions is a training consultant located in Liverpool, England. In their article, Liverpool Training Solutions discusses the top ten most common injuries athletes are affected by later in life. Liverpool Training Solutions emphasizes the fact that injuries are a part of sports and exercise, so it’s very common for even the healthiest of people to become injured at one point or another. This idea is reinforced in Liver Training Solutions in their article when they say “However remote that possibility is at any given moment, that repeated wear and tear on your body eventually adds up, leading to excessive stress on the muscles and joints that lead to injury.” Liverpool Training Solutions states that athletes are already putting their bodies risks for later on in life and “Whether you play an impact sport such as football or engage in individual competition such as gymnastics, the demands on athletics can increase the likelihood you will experience an injury.” Liverpool Training Solutions provides a wealth of skills and knowledge through their team of expert consultants on body health and safety. I can use this article in my essay to highlight the risks athletes take, and how injuries in baseball and softball can be forever lingering on your body (pulled muscles and shoulder injuries specifically) if not taken care of correctly.

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  7. hannahslaterblog says:

    Quinn, Michael and Lynch, Andrea. “Is ADHD a “Real” disorder?” Support for Learning 1 Feb. 2016. Academic Search Premier, http://web.b.ebscohost.com.librda.mville.edu:2048/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=4&sid=a659eeff-f8d4-4b57-b11a-4ef1039f4dcb%40sessionmgr101&hid=124. Accessed 23 Feb. 2017. In this article, Quinn and Lynch discuss ADHD on a global level and how often it is misunderstood leading to misjudgment. Quinn and Lynch discuss, in their article, the science behind ADHD and the plethora of research as an attempt to further explain that ADHD is in fact a real disorder. Quinn and Lynch even state, “Findings from genetic and neurological studies have given weight to the argument that ADHD is a valid disorder.” They then go on to list various examples found in the research. Eventually Quinn and Lynch convey the views of critics on the “real disorder” they said, “ADHD is perhaps nothing more than an example of the ‘medicalization’ of behaviors in children which are the most annoying and problematic for adults to control.” Quinn is a professor at the University College Dublin in the education program. Lynch is the undergraduate program coordinator for the psychology department at Harvard University. The article was published last year and it ties into my topic of ADHD and the common misconceptions and how we can change the misjudgment those who struggle with ADHD receive. I am using this for my presentation to give students who don’t know about ADHD a better idea of what it is in order to withhold any possible misjudgments from them.

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  8. lauraprestipino says:

    NEW ANNOTATION:
    Britto, Pia R et al. “Advancing Early Childhood Development: from Science to Scale 2. Nurturing Care: Promoting Early Childhood Development.” Lancet, vol. 389, no. 10064, 7 Jan. 2017, pps. 91-102. Academic Search Premier http://web.b.ebscohost.com.librda.mville.edu:2048/ehost/detail/detail?vid=2&sid=fd04b3a4-b9da-47a7-b347-89bd78220209%40sessionmgr104&hid=118&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=aph&AN=120653346. Accessed 21 Feb. 2017. Within this article, Britto et al share their findings from interventions performed amongst families to determine how children are affected by child and social protection, health, education and nutrition (Britto et al). Within each of those five aspects, a deep analysis and portrayal information was included, such as maternal and paternal health, malnutrition amongst children, impact of early education and a look into abusive home environments (Britto et al). Each section that explained the various studies that took place mirrored the differences in children who received two different types of treatment, such as the positive and negative outcomes that certain factors have on a growing child (Britto et al). This particular article had fifteen different authors contribute to its publication, and all are more than qualified within their fields. Britto, Pia R is an Author at UNICEF, and her main focus on the articles she writes are centered around children. Lye, Stephen J is a Senior Executive at Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute (Sinai Health System) with a specialty in women and infant health. Proulx, Kerrie most recently was a Research Consultant for the “Evaluation of Preschool and Disaster Risk Reduction Model” in Indonesia, and Yousafzai, Aisha K is an Associate Professor of Global Health at Harvard University. Matthews, Stephen G is a Research Associate at Newcastle University, and Vaivada, Tyler is a Clinical Research Project Assistant at the SickKids Centre for Global Child Health. Perez-Escamilla, Rafael works as a Professor of Epidemiology and is a Director of the Office of Public Health and Global Health Concentration and Yale University. Rao, Nirmala is a Professor in Early Childhood Development and Education at the University of Hong Kong, and Ip, Patrick is a Professor at the University as well, in the Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. Fernald, Lia C is a Professor in the School of Public Health at UC Berkeley, MacMillan, Harriet is a Professor at McMaster University in Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, and Hanson, Mark is the President of the International Society for the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, and researches concerns on birth affects. Wachs, Theodore D is a Professor at Purdue University in the Department of Psychological Sciences, Haogen, Yao is an Education Specialist at UNICEF, Bhutta, Zulfiqar A is the Robert Harding Inaugural Chair in Global Child Health at the Hospital for SickKids, and Leckman, James F works at the Yale School of Medicine, and is a Professor of Child Psychiatry, Psychiatry, Psychology and Pediatrics. Lastly, Cerezo, Adrian is a Chief Constructive Innovation Officer at CRIA Studio, with a focus on the Fundamental Role of Early Childhood Development Policies and Programs Cost Effectiveness, and Yoshikawa, Hirokazu works at at NYU Steinhart and is the Courtney Sale Ross Professor of Globalization and Education, as well as a Co-Director of the Global TIES for Children Center at NYU. The article published is very recent, considering it was one month ago, and ties in perfectly with a focus on poverty and how it affects children during their developmental years.

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  9. jahnese98 says:

    Wrape Patti. “Prematurity Research Disproves the Theory that Preemies Catch Up By Age Three.” prematurity.org National Library of Medicine’s, PubMeb Online Database. http://www.prematurity.org/research/not-catchingup2.html. Accessed 23 Feb 2017. In this article, a mother named Patti Wrape, of premature twin boys gives information about the online research she did regarding the idea that premature babies will develop by the age of 3. Wrape says the earlier the premee is born the less that child’s brain is developed, which is to be proven true. Wrape says in the article that of 40-50% of children born prematurely are 3 to 4 times more likely to struggle in school compared to children who were in the womb full term. I plan on using this article for my research essay to help me get not just points across of the facts behind a child being prematurely, but the point of view of a parent who has a premature child as well

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  10. ayaj1998 says:

    Britto, Pia R, et al. “Nurturing Care: Promoting Early Childhood Development.” The Lancet, vol. 389, no. 10064, Jan. 2017, pp. 91–102. Science Direct, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140673616313903 . Accessed 22 Feb. 2017. In this article, Britto, et al. discusses how low income families affect their children so that are not able to achieve their development potential. Britto conveys the idea that children who are sent to informal preschools by families have weaker skills, such as motor skills for example. Britto argues how people of higher incomes can spend more money on the proper nutrients their child is required to have. Britto provides insight on the different perspectives from low income families and the effects they have on their children’s health, education, and emotional health. Moreover, Britto concludes that supporting families, caregivers, and families need to provide nurturing care and protection in young children’s lives to improve higher developmental outcomes. Britto obtained her doctoral degree in developmental psychology from Teacher’s College at Columbia University. Britto has received several national, international grants, and awards for her work. Lye is a recognized leader in the field of women’s and infants’ health. As well as leading the Ontario birth study. Yousafzai has written extensively about early childhood interventions in low- and middle-income countries. Matthews was a Supervisor in Chemical Biology of Health & Disease and PhD. Perez-Escamilla is a Professor of Epidemiology & Public Health. Rao is Developmental and Chartered Educational Psychologist. Ip, is continuing UChicago’s proud tradition of innovation. Fernald is an Associate Professor in Community Health and Human Development at the School of Public Health at the University of California. MacMillan is a psychiatrist and pediatrician for conducting family violence research. Hanson is one of the United Kingdom’s leading researchers on developmental pathways to disease. Education Consultant at United States Fund For UNICEF. Yoshikawa is the Courtney Sale Ross Professor of Globalization and Education at NYU Steinhardt. Cerezo is a Chief Constructive Innovation Officer at CRIAstudio. Leckman is a professor in the child study center and professor of pediatrics. Bhutta is the Robert Harding Inaugural Chair in Global Child Health at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. The article was published this year, and it ties into my topic on integrating technology into early childhood classrooms. I will use this in my paper to support my view of that schools should improve curriculums to enhance children’s skills.

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  11. blogsbyjos says:

    Kilbride, Samantha. “Feminism: The Importance In Removing The Stigma From The New F-Word.” Elite Daily, 6 Aug. 2015, Elite Daily, elitedaily.com/women/femi-nazi-feminism-wrong-perspective-change/976974/. Accessed 21 Feb. 2017. Samantha Kilbride starts of this article by stating that she had always believed in the equality of genders but regardless of that she never even thought of calling herself a feminist because of all of the misconceptions associated with the word until fairly recently.  Kilbride makes it a point that there are many people like her that also don’t want to call themselves feminists and then she goes to give us examples such as Lady Gaga, Taylor Swift, etc. Kilbride also states that she believes that gender issues among many other worldy problems is a problem that should be addressed since it affects so many. The author Samantha Kilbride states that “It must become clear that the movement of feminism is to celebrate both genders and to liberate both men and women from the gender roles.” Kilbride finishes of by saying that there is no one picture for feminists and if you believe in the equality of the genders then you too should consider yourself a feminist. Samantha Kilbride is a contributing author in Elite Magazine and has written  articles based on human rights, poetry and health and fitness. We plan to use this article to show the misconceptions of feminism in society and why women’s rights/ feminist issues should be something to be taken seriously.

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  12. migueoceguera says:

    Belt, David D. “Anti-Islam Discourse In The United States In The Decade After 9/11: The Role Of Social Conservatives And Cultural Politics.” Journal Of Ecumenical Studies, vol. 5, no. 2, 2016, pp. 210-223. Academic Search Premier. Accessed 19 Feb. 2017. In this article, Belt discusses hostility in the United States towards Islamic followers after the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. Belt states that many of the religious and social conservatives are classifying not only the terrorist groups but the entire religion of Islam as a security threat to the United States. Belt describes the belief as “The Green Fear”, which was colored fear was exactly like the Red Scare with Communism, as a “non violent plan of Islamization”. Belt says that “there was much more going on than protecting the country from Islam” as a way to show that this country was not only being threatening towards the Islam religion just to protect the United States, but to also be discriminating the Islam Religion as well. Belt chairs the Department of Regional Issues of the College of Strategic Intelligence. Being the Chairman of the Department of Regional Issues, he studies the issues that are occurring in the Region of the United States. The article was posted in 2016 and it ties into my topic of Islamophobia in the United States. I will definitely use this in my paper to defend the point of view that the United States, especially Social Conservatives are threatening to eliminate the Religion of Islam in the United States.

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  13. CamilaSalazar says:

    Alger, Anne-Marie. “‘I don’t know who I am anymore’: Losing my identity.” Counselling Directory. 12. Jun. 2014. Counselling Directory. http://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/counsellor-articles/i-dont-know-who-i-am-anymore-losing-my-identity. Accessed 25. Feb. 2017. In this article, Alger explains how someone’s identity can be loss and discusses the effects it causes on people. Alger provides some steps to help these people to find their lost identity and incorporate it into their lives again. Alger is describing a problem that not everyone is aware of; however, as humans beings, they go through this at some point without even noticing it. Moreover, Alger argues that “Our sense of self – our ‘identity’ – should not come from what others think about us, how we look, or how we behave” because at this point is when people try to seek a new identity that makes them feel “normal” within the society. Alger is a psychotherapist who helps people to resolve, accept or adapt to new environments without losing their self-esteem. As a member of the Counselling Directory, most of Alger articles are posted there. The article was published almost 3 years ago, and it ties into my topic of first generation Latinos and their loss of identity. Even though Alger does not mention Latinos in her article at all, I will use this in my paper to define the term “loss of identity” since many people do not have a clear understanding of it.

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  14. anastasiaromanowski says:

    Willingham, Daniel T. “Why Does Family Wealth Affect Learning?” American Educator March 2012. EBSCO Host, http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/73372052/why-does-family-wealth-affect-learning Accessed 23 Feb. 2017. In this article, Willingham discusses socioeconomic status (SES) of students and their families and how it affects their learning. Willingham conveys his belief that, a student’s home life and their family’s financial status can influence the type of schooling they are entitled to which can vary depending on different SES. In fact, Willingham suggests that there is an unfairness among students due to the fact that not everyone will be able to receive the same type of education and students with low SES will not have the same opportunities as students with high SES. Moreover, Willingham argues that schools for low SES students do not put as much effort and work into helping their students. Willingham is a professor at the University of Virginia who teaches cognitive psychology. Willingham is also the author of the book Why Don’t Students Like School? The article was published in march 2012 and it ties into my topic of treatment of students in public schools and private schools. I will use this article in my paper to show how socioeconomic status affects a student’s education because it decides what type of school a student is able to attend.

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  15. merrillstephen10 says:

    Willingham, Daniel T. “Why Does Family Wealth Affect Learning.” American Educator March. 2012. EBSCOhost, http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/73372052/why-does-family-wealth-affect-learning. Accessed 23 Feb. 2017. In this article Willingham discusses how family wealth affects learning and why financial status affects the learning of children. Willingham conveys his belief that one’s financial status affects the way they are educated by schools and teachers. In fact Willingham says that “common knowledge has it right” that “on average, kids from wealthy families do significantly better than kids from poor families.” Moreover, Willingham argues that the effect of wealth on education “must be indirect and accrue overtime.” Willingham is a professor of cognitive psychology at the University of Virginia, author of a popular literary work titled Why Don’t Students Like School, and was appointed by president Obama to be part of his National Board for Education Sciences. This article was published in March of 2012 and it ties to my topic of the impact socioeconomic status has on schooling of children. I will use this article in my paper to support the point of view that the wealth of families does affect the way teachers educate students.

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  16. don24selimaj says:

    Alger, Anne-Marie. “’I don’t know who I am anymore’: Losing my identity.” Counselling Directory, 12 June 2014, http://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/counsellor-articles/i-dont-know-who-i-am-anymore-losing-my-identity. Accessed 24 Feb. 2017. In this article, Alger, who is a psychotherapist, a counsellor, a supervisor, an MA (A Master of the Arts), and a MBACP (Member of British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy), she discusses the significance of an identity and how it can be lost. Alger states that “losing your identity can be a long process over a period of months or years, but can also happen suddenly following a major life event or trauma.” There are many factors that contribute to a loss of an identity, but the recurring cause is some sort of drastic change; whether it’s in the workplace, in the family, in a relationship, and even in oneself. Alger emphasizes that when this happens, people start looking for self-worth in others because they no longer have a clear sense of who they are anymore. Since that person is lost, they try a various set of tactics to gain guidance back. However, Alger addresses the problem with that and how “our ‘identity’- should not come from what others think about us, how we look, or how we behave” because then we become worried about being judged and don’t show our true self. The most important part about this process as Alger states is, “awareness that you have ‘lost’ your identity is one of the first steps towards finding it again. After that, psychotherapy and counselling could help explore the problem and have a satisfactory result. This article was a great outline for my group and I because it covered all the aspects of the issue, from how you can define a loss of identity, to how it can happen, and finally, how to gain it back.

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  17. Anonymous says:

    Chaney, Cassandra and Ray Robertson. “Racism and Police Brutality in America.” Journal of African American Studies, vol. 17, no. 4, Dec. 2013, pp. 480-505. EBSCOhost, http://librda.mville.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=91673554&site=ehost-live. Accessed 26 Feb. 2017. In this article, the authors discuss illegal actions made by police, how African Americans are portrayed in the media, and how cases of police brutality are slowly increasing amongst African Americans. The authors indicate that “…Blacks are viewed as deserving of harsh treatment in the criminal justice system” (Peffley and Hurwitz 2013). The authors support their belief based on a conducted research study, “…Black people in general, and Black males in particular, are caricatured as aggressive and criminal, police are more likely to view Black men as a threat which justifies the disproportionate use of deadly force.” Chaney is an associate professor of Child and Family Studies at Louisiana State University. Meanwhile, Robertson is a professor of the Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice at Lamar University. The article was published in 2013, which makes it fairly recent. I believe that this article has some information that I could use in my presentation and paper on Law Enforcement and African Americans.

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  18. Anonymous says:

    I accidentally posted the one above as an anonymous user: (reposting)

    Chaney, Cassandra and Ray Robertson. “Racism and Police Brutality in America.” Journal of African American Studies, vol. 17, no. 4, Dec. 2013, pp. 480-505. EBSCOhost, http://librda.mville.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=91673554&site=ehost-live. Accessed 26 Feb. 2017. In this article, the authors discuss illegal actions made by police, how African Americans are portrayed in the media, and how cases of police brutality are slowly increasing amongst African Americans. The authors indicate that “…Blacks are viewed as deserving of harsh treatment in the criminal justice system” (Peffley and Hurwitz 2013). The authors support their belief based on a conducted research study, “…Black people in general, and Black males in particular, are caricatured as aggressive and criminal, police are more likely to view Black men as a threat which justifies the disproportionate use of deadly force.” Chaney is an associate professor of Child and Family Studies at Louisiana State University. Meanwhile, Robertson is a professor of the Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice at Lamar University. The article was published in 2013, which makes it fairly recent. I believe that this article has some information that I could use in my presentation and paper on Law Enforcement and African Americans.

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  19. marissacordaro says:

    Murray, Sharon D. “Supporting The Whole Child Through Coordinated Policies, Processes, and Practices.” Journal of School Health. vol. 85 no. 11. November 2015. pp. 795-80. Education Research Complete, http://web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?sid=a13bd155-d87f-48b9-ae72-82e0d523b991%40sessionmgr4010&vid=0&hid=4104&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#AN=110138278&db=ehh. Accessed 26 Feb. 2017. In this article, Murray discusses the roles that the school districts and schools play in developing and implementing policies, processes, and practices to create learning environments that support the whole child. Murray conveys her belief that school districts play an essential role to developing a child, and that in order for a child to be successful, there are numerous things that come into play, especially when it comes to the learning environment. Murray said, “Redesigning school systems to meet the comprehensive needs of children helps education reform fulfill its promise.” Murray proclaimed, “The district coordinator role takes on great significance for implementing the WSCC framework.” Murray stated, “As districts conduct a comprehensive scan of existing policies, processes, and practices, the coordinator will be integral to outlining priorities, identifying gaps, and recommending strategies to improve the health of students.” Murray described, “District policies provide guidance to teams. However, teams should be afforded a degree of autonomy to adapt processes and practices to local needs.” Murray declared, “Even with policies in place, accountability systems need to be applied to ensure that policies, processes, and practices are aligned and consistently implemented.” Sharon Murray is the President of RMC Health, which is an organization that is for professional development in school health and health education, to support the health of students. She used to serve as the Executive Director of the Society of State Directors of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. The article was published in 2015, and it ties into my topic that education policy starts from the administration. I will use this article in my paper to support that if you have good coordinators, in my case administration at the top, everything stems down from there, and you will have effective policies that the teachers want to implement.

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  20. samcalkins says:

    Murray, Sharon D., et al. “Supporting the Whole Child through Coordinated Policies, Processes, and Practices.” Journal of School Health, vol. 85, no. 11, Nov. 2015, pp. 795-801. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1111/josh.12306. Sharon Murray http://web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=c65f39ca-9446-4f4d-8a75-4b3078461190%40sessionmgr4008&vid=3&hid=4201 Accessed March 1, 2017. Murray evaluates how important the role of a school district is in developing policies to benefit the students. Murray focused on how to provide a safe learning environment and how different environments effect a student’s health and well-being. Murray’s results show that there are three key factors that affect policies. These three factors are hiring a coordinator, having a collaborative team, and the data collected from the school that is trying to improve. Murray discusses the process and procedures on how to properly come up with a policy for a school. Murray states “Policies are statements that define requirements and provide guidance.” Murray believes that “redesigning school systems to meet the comprehensive needs of children helps education reform fulfill its promise.” As well as “developing and implementing a policy is a complex and time-intensive process that requires extensive planning, information gathering, and building support with stakeholders.” Murray examines other factors that have a role in the process of creating a policy. These include professional preparation, professional development, resource development and funding. Murray quoted “School communities should be given the opportunity to define specific priorities to reduce barriers to learning.” Sharon Murray is the president of the RMC Health which is a national organization for professional development in school health to support the health of children, youth, their schools, and their communities. The article was published in 2015 which is relatively recent. I will use this in my paper to define what a policy is and how it is made in relation to how an inclusion classroom policy should be made and implemented in school districts. Also to show that an inclusion classroom policy can benefit student’s health.

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  21. shannonblackford says:

    Fessenden, Ford and Park, Haeyoun. “Chicago’s Murder Problem.” The New York Times 27 May. 2016. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/05/18/us/chicago-murder-problem.html?r=0&_r=2. Accessed 1 Mar. 2017. In this article, Fessenden and Park discusses the crime rates in Chicago for homicide has increased overtime, and why it is one of the most popular city that is carrying such a high rate of violence. Fessenden and Park talks about how Gun violence make a huge difference in the city of Chicago and New York. Fessenden and Park state, “Chicago has a reputation for strict gun laws, and gun rights advocates often point to it as proof that gun regulation doesn’t reduce violence.” Fessenden and Park then argues that, “Black gangs have splintered into small, disparate factions, whose disputes are less over territory and profits, and more over personal insults or shames, often fueled by social media” We can see how gun restrictions and gang violence have an important factor as to how Chicago’s crime rate has gone up over the course of time. Fessenden is a New York Times graphics editor; he has won numerous awards for recognition for his investigations pieces. He has also written and posted data about suburban communities in New York of the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal and others. The article was published last year and ties into our topic on social inequality and wealth disparity. I will be tying this article into my research by discussing the impact social inequality and wealth disparity affects the African-American community, and how they are being biasedly targeted about their actions through the media.

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  22. cailynburgos says:

    Strickland, Amelia. “Exploring the Effects of Social Media Use on the Mental Health of
    Young Adults.”(2014). HIM 1990-2015. 1684. http://stars.library.ucf.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2683&context=honorstheses1990-2015. Accessed 18 Feb. 2017. In this article, Strickland explores the different types of mental illnesses that can affect young adults and relates it to social media by using various case studies and other research tools. Strickland shares her belief that in more ways than one, social media plays a huge part in the everyday lives of young adults and in many cases has caused different issues regarding their mental health and outside relationships. Strickland states that the study of this issue can be divided into two completely different sections; individual theories and social theories. She then thoroughly explains “ Similarly, the body image of young people, particularly girls and young women, seems to be affected through consumption of online media” therefore showing that mental illness and/or any other types of mental and emotional issues can be brought to the surface for anyone actively involved in social media. Strickland studied at the University of Central Florida, earning her B.A. in Public Relations, Advertising and Communication. She also began studying in 2015 to earn her Master’s Degree in Mental Health Counseling. Strickland was also a Public Relations Intern at the Orlando Science Center. The source was published a few years ago and it relates to my topic on mental illness and social media. I plan on using this in my paper to prove that there is an existing relationship between young adults using social media and suffering from mental and emotional issues.

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